Japanese Tea Ceremony - Sencha Tea Ceremony

Sencha Tea Ceremony

Like the formal art surrounding matcha, there is a formal art surrounding sencha, which is distinguished as senchadō (煎茶道?, the way of sencha). Generally it involves the high-grade gyokuro class of sencha. This ceremony, more Chinese in style, was introduced to Japan in the 17th century by Ingen, the founder of the Ōbaku school of Zen Buddhism, which is in general more Chinese in style than earlier schools. It remains associated with the Ōbaku school, and the head temple of Manpuku-ji hosts regular sencha tea ceremony conventions.

Read more about this topic:  Japanese Tea Ceremony

Other articles related to "tea, sencha tea ceremony, sencha, tea ceremony":

Ilex Guayusa - Commercialization
... with indigenous farming families to purchase guayusa leaves and then markets guayusa tea in the United States ... Guayusa can also be purchased from companies such as NovoAndina International, Art of Tea, Stash Tea, Guayusa Tea House, DAVIDsTEA, and Sunfood ...
Sencha Tea Ceremony
... Senchadō (The Formal Art of Sencha Appreciation) Like the formal art surrounding matcha, there is a formal art surrounding sencha, which is distinguished as senchad ... Generally it involves the high-grade gyokuro class of sencha ...
Tetsubin - History
... Japan, but many believe that the popularity of the tetsubin pot grew alongside sencha, a form a leaf tea ... China introduced Japan to sencha around the middle of the 17th century ... Sencha was not considered as formal as matcha, the common powdered green tea at the time ...
Tetsubin
... used for boiling and pouring hot water for drinking purposes, such as for making tea ... (See list of Japanese tea ceremony equipment) ... During the 19th century, infused tea became more popular and tetsubin were considered primarily status symbols rather than functional kitchen items ...

Famous quotes containing the words ceremony and/or tea:

    We want beans, not goals.
    —Mexican steelworkers’ banner at opening ceremony of 1986 World Cup soccer championship.

    “I shall sit here, serving tea to friends. . . .”
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)