Japanese Nuclear Weapon Program

Japanese Nuclear Weapon Program

The Japanese program to develop nuclear weapons was conducted during World War II. Like the German nuclear weapons program, it suffered from an array of problems, and was ultimately unable to progress beyond the laboratory stage before the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender in August 1945.

Today, Japan's nuclear energy infrastructure makes it eminently capable of constructing nuclear weapons at will. The de-militarization of Japan and the protection of the United States' nuclear umbrella have led to a strong policy of non-weaponization of nuclear technology, but in the face of nuclear weapons testing by North Korea, some politicians and former military officials in Japan are calling for a reversal of this policy.

Read more about Japanese Nuclear Weapon Program:  Background, World War II, Postwar

Other articles related to "japanese nuclear weapon program, nuclear":

Japanese Nuclear Weapon Program - Postwar - De Facto Nuclear State
... See also Nuclear latency While there are currently no known plans in Japan to produce nuclear weapons, it has been argued Japan has the technology ... For this reason Japan is often said to be a "screwdriver's turn" away from possessing nuclear weapons ... amounts of reactor-grade plutonium are created as a by-product of the nuclear energy industry, and Japan was reported in December 1995 to have 4.7 tons of plutonium, enough for around 700 nuclear warheads ...

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