Janet Kennedy

Janet Kennedy (c. 1480 – c. 1545), the first daughter of John Kennedy, 2nd Lord Kennedy and Lady Elizabeth Gordon. She became a mistress of King James IV of Scotland.

Through her father, she was a great-great-granddaughter of King Robert III. Janet Kennedy's mother, Lady Elizabeth Gordon, was a daughter of Alexander Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly.

Originally she was married to the formidable Archibald Douglas, 5th Earl of Angus ("Bell the Cat"), they had a daughter, Mary, together.

She attracted the attention of King James IV around 1497. She bore the King three children. They included James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray, Margaret and Jane Stewart.

The King had a number of mistresses, but this appears to have been his longest relationship, which continued even after his marriage to Margaret Tudor. After James IV's marriage by proxy, he met Janet at Bothwell Castle in April 1503, then she was sent to Darnaway Castle in August just before Margaret arrived.

It is not clear if she is the same as the "Janet bair ars" who received gifts from the king in 1505–12.

She also had relationships with two other men. Two of her partners died at the Battle of Flodden Field.

Other articles related to "janet, janet kennedy, kennedy":

Lord Bothwell
... Sinclair had subsequently married Edmund Chisholm, whose daughter by a second marriage with Janet Drummond is sometimes given erroneously as Edmund's first wife ... Their daughter Janet Chisholme became by marriage Janet Napier ... He then married Janet Kennedy, daughter of John Kennedy, 2nd Lord Kennedy, and Lady Elizabeth Seton, c ...
John Ramsay, 1st Lord Bothwell
... married Edmund Chisholm, whose daughter by a second marriage with Janet Drummond is sometimes given erroneously as Edmund's first wife ... Their daughter Janet Chisholme became by marriage Janet Napier ... He then married Janet Kennedy, daughter of John Kennedy, 2nd Lord Kennedy, and Lady Elizabeth Seton, c ...

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