Jamaica - Religion

Religion

Christianity is the largest religion practised in Jamaica and according to the 2001 census, the country's largest denominations are the Church of God of Prophecy (24% of the population), Seventh-day Adventist Church (11%), Pentecostal (10%), Baptist (7%), Anglican (4%), Roman Catholic (2%), United Church (2%), Methodist (2%), Moravian (1%) and Plymouth Brethren (1%) The Christian faith gained acceptance as British Christian abolitionists and Baptist missionaries joined educated former slaves in the struggle against slavery.

The Rastafari movement had 24,000 adherents, according to the 2001 census. Other religions in Jamaica include Jehovah's Witnesses (2% population), the Bahá'í faith, which counts perhaps 8,000 adherents and 21 Local Spiritual Assemblies, Buddhism, and Hinduism. There is a small population of Jews, about 200, who describe themselves as Liberal-Conservative. The first Jews in Jamaica trace their roots back to early 15th century Spain and Portugal. Other small groups include Muslims, who claim 5,000 adherents, as do the Mormons. These numbers reflect the fact that general Jamaican culture does not lend itself much to fundamentalist approaches to religion and life.

Read more about this topic:  Jamaica

Other articles related to "religion, religions":

Hindu - Definition
... was quoted in an Indian Supreme Court ruling When we think of the Hindu religion, unlike other religions in the world, the Hindu religion does not claim any one prophet it does not worship any one god ... argue that the Hinduism is not a religion per se but rather a reification of a diverse set of traditions and practices by scholars who constituted a unified system and arbitrarily labeled it Hinduism ... between "Hindus" and followers of other religions during the periodic census undertaken by the colonial British government in India ...
Middle East - Demographics - Religions
... Main article Religion in the Middle East The Middle East is very diverse when it comes to religions, many of which originated there ... in its many forms is by far the largest religion in the Middle East, but other faiths that originated there, such as Judaism and Christianity, are also well represented ... There are also important minority religions like Bahá'í, Yazdânism, Zoroastrianism, Mandeanism, Druze, Yarsan, Yazidism and Shabakism, and in ancient times the region was ...
Young Hegelians - History
... existence as a distinct group, and it was their attitude to religion that distinguished the left and right from then onwards (August Cieszkowski is a ... King Wilhelm III, under the influence of his relatively enlightened minister of religion, health and education Altenstein, allowed pretty much anything to be said about religion so long as there was practical ... Young Hegelians at first found it easier to direct their critical energies towards religion than politics ...
Religion - Criticism
... Main article Criticism of religion Religious criticism has a long history, going back at least as far as the 5th century BCE ... the Middle Ages, potential critics of religion were persecuted and largely forced to remain silent ... thinkers like David Hume and Voltaire criticized religion ...
Saarland - Religion
... Religion in Saarland - 2007 religion percent Roman Catholics   64.1% Protestants   19.5% Other or none   22.0% The Saarlanders are the most religious ...

Famous quotes containing the word religion:

    My great religion is a belief in the blood, the flesh, as being wiser than the intellect. We can go wrong in our minds. But what our blood feels and believes and says, is always true. The intellect is only a bit and a bridle.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    The true meaning of religion is thus, not simply morality, but morality touched by emotion.
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    If ... we admit a divinity, why not divine worship? and if worship, why not religion to teach this worship? and if a religion, why not the Christian, if a better cannot be assigned, and it be already established by the laws of our country, and handed down to us from our forefathers?
    George Berkeley (1685–1753)