Jacksonville Beaches

The Jacksonville Beaches, known locally as the "Beaches" or simply the "Beach", are a group of towns and communities on the northern half of an unnamed barrier island on the US state of Florida's First Coast, all of which are suburbs or parts of the city of Jacksonville. These communities are separated from the main body of the city of Jacksonville by the Intracoastal Waterway. The Jacksonville Beaches are located in Duval and northern St. Johns County, and make up part of the Jacksonville metropolitan area. The population of the beaches in 2009 is 68,118. The main communities generally identified as part of the Beaches are Mayport, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Jacksonville Beach, and Ponte Vedra Beach.

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Other articles related to "jacksonville beaches, jacksonville":

Neighborhoods Of Jacksonville - Jacksonville Beaches
... The Jacksonville Beaches are a group of towns and communities along the Atlantic Ocean ... They are, from north to south, Mayport, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Jacksonville Beach, and Ponte Vedra Beach ... within Duval County Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach are incorporated cities that maintain their own municipal governments, while Ponte Vedra Beach, in St ...
Neighborhoods In Jacksonville, Florida - Jacksonville Beaches
... The Jacksonville Beaches are a group of towns and communities along the Atlantic Ocean ... north to south, Mayport, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Jacksonville Beach, and Ponte Vedra Beach ... The first four communities are located within Duval County Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach are incorporated cities that maintain their own municipal ...

Famous quotes containing the word beaches:

    They commonly celebrate those beaches only which have a hotel on them, not those which have a humane house alone. But I wished to see that seashore where man’s works are wrecks; to put up at the true Atlantic House, where the ocean is land-lord as well as sea-lord, and comes ashore without a wharf for the landing; where the crumbling land is the only invalid, or at best is but dry land, and that is all you can say of it.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)