Israeli Legislative Election

Some articles on israeli legislative election, elections, legislative, election, legislative election:

Israeli Legislative Election, 1992 - Thirteenth Knesset
... Peres called early elections in 1996 in order to seek a mandate to continue the peace process, in which he lost ...
Legislative Council
... A legislative council is the name given to the legislatures, or one of the chambers of the legislature of many nations and colonies ... A member of a legislative council is commonly referred to as an MLC ...
1935 Elections
... The following elections occurred in the year 1935 ... Danish Folketing election, 1935 Greek legislative election, 1935 Guatemalan Constitutional Assembly election, 1935 Guatemalan presidential election, 1935 Philippine legislative election, 1935 Philippine presidential ...
1925 Elections
... The following elections occurred in the year 1925 ... Argentine legislative election, 1924 Belgian general election, 1925 Chilean presidential election, 1925 Dutch general election, 1925 Guatemalan parliamentary election, 1925 Luxembourgian legislative election ...
1906 Elections - Europe
... Portuguese legislative election, April 1906 Portuguese legislative election, August 1906 Russian legislative election, 1906 ...

Famous quotes containing the words election, israeli and/or legislative:

    He hung out of the window a long while looking up and down the street. The world’s second metropolis. In the brick houses and the dingy lamplight and the voices of a group of boys kidding and quarreling on the steps of a house opposite, in the regular firm tread of a policeman, he felt a marching like soldiers, like a sidewheeler going up the Hudson under the Palisades, like an election parade, through long streets towards something tall white full of colonnades and stately. Metropolis.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)

    ...I want to see a film, they send the Israeli army reserves to escort me! What kind of life is this?
    Golda Meir (1898–1978)

    Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power vested in it; a liberty to follow my own will in all things, when the rule prescribes not, and not to be subject to the inconstant, unknown, arbitrary will of another man.
    John Locke (1632–1704)