Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 2 (1940)

Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 2 (1940) is the second volume of Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories, which is a series of short story collections, edited by Isaac Asimov and Martin H. Greenberg, which attempts to list the great science fiction stories from the Golden Age of Science Fiction. They date the Golden Age as beginning in 1939 and lasting until 1963. The book was later reprinted as the second half of Isaac Asimov Presents The Golden Years of Science Fiction: 36 Stories and Novellas with the first half being Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 1 (1939).

This volume was originally published by DAW books in August 1979.

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    Every one of my friends had a bad day somewhere in her history she wished she could forget but couldn’t. A very bad mother day changes you forever. Those were the hardest stories to tell. . . . “I could still see the red imprint of his little bum when I changed his diaper that night. I stared at my hand, as if they were alien parts of myself . . . as if they had betrayed me. From that day on, I never hit him again.”
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