Isaac Asimov Presents The Golden Years of Science Fiction, Sixth Series

Isaac Asimov Presents The Golden Years of Science Fiction, Sixth Series is a 1988 hardcover reprint of Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 11 (1949) and Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories 12 (1950). It is the last in a series of 6 two-volume books which together reprinted the first 12 of 25 books in the Isaac Asimov Presents The Great SF Stories series of compilations.

Other articles related to "years":

Chariots Of Fire - Awards and Recognition - Popular Lists
... Chariots of Fire theme American Film Institute recognition AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies - Nominated AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores - Nominated AFI's 100 Years...100 Cheers. 100 AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition) - Nominated AFI's 10 Top 10 - Nominated ...
Leni Riefenstahl - Post-war Life and Career - Photography and Final Film
... her cameraman Horst Kettner, who was 40 years her junior and assisted her with the photographs they were together from the time she was 60 and he was 20 ... Years later she photographed Las Vegas entertainers Siegfried and Roy ... In her later years, Riefenstahl became known for her longevity and physical stamina, although she often suffered considerable pain from old injuries ...
FM-2030 - Name Change
... I am not who I was ten years ago and certainly not who I will be in twenty years ... The name 2030 reflects my conviction that the years around 2030 will be a magical time ...
Election - Characteristics - Scheduling
... elections are held between every three and six years in most states, with exceptions such as the U.S ... House of Representatives, which stands for election every two years ... presidents the President of Ireland is elected every seven years, the President of Russia and the President of Finland every six years, the President of ...

Famous quotes containing the words sixth, series, science, isaac, asimov, presents, golden and/or years:

    If you are willing to inconvenience yourself in the name of discipline, the battle is half over. Leave Grandma’s early if the children are acting impossible. Depart the ballpark in the sixth inning if you’ve warned the kids and their behavior is still poor. If we do something like this once, our kids will remember it for a long time.
    Fred G. Gosman (20th century)

    Depression moods lead, almost invariably, to accidents. But, when they occur, our mood changes again, since the accident shows we can draw the world in our wake, and that we still retain some degree of power even when our spirits are low. A series of accidents creates a positively light-hearted state, out of consideration for this strange power.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)

    After sitting in my chamber many days, reading the poets, I have been out early on a foggy morning and heard the cry of an owl in a neighboring wood as from a nature behind the common, unexplored by science or by literature.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Behold, Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man.
    Bible: Hebrew Jacob, in Genesis, 27:11.

    To his mother Rebekah, explaining how the blind Isaac might discover the ploy of his pretending to be Esau. “Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents.” (25:27)

    Science fiction writers foresee the inevitable, and although problems and catastrophes may be inevitable, solutions are not.
    —Isaac Asimov (1920–1992)

    Whensoever any affliction assails me, mee thinks I have the keyes of my prison in mine owne hand, and no remedy presents it selfe so soone to my heart, as mine own sword. Often meditation of this hath wonne me to a charitable interpretation of their action, who dy so: and provoked me a little to watch and exagitate their reasons, which pronounce so peremptory judgements upon them.
    John Donne (c. 1572–1631)

    They think how one life hums, revolves and toils,
    One cog in a golden singing hive:
    Stephen Spender (1909–1995)

    Strange that the mind will forget so much of what only this moment has passed, and yet hold clear and bright the memory of what happened years ago with men and women long since dead.
    Philip Dunne (1908–1992)