Irreparable Injury Rule

Some articles on irreparable injury rule, irreparable injury:

The Irreparable Injury Rule
... that no relief can be granted unless there is irreparable injury ... This requirement, commonly called the "irreparable injury rule", has been the subject of sustained academic criticism, especially by remedies scholar Douglas Laycock, who has ... Nevertheless, the irreparable injury rule was reaffirmed by the U.S ...

Famous quotes containing the words irreparable injury, rule, irreparable and/or injury:

    Many divorces are not really the result of irreparable injury but involve, instead, a desire on the part of the man or woman to shatter the setup, start out from scratch alone, and make life work for them all over again. They want the risk of disaster, want to touch bottom, see where bottom is, and, coming up, to breathe the air with relief and relish again.
    Edward Hoagland (b. 1932)

    It has come to be practically a sort of rule in literature, that a man, having once shown himself capable of original writing, is entitled thenceforth to steal from the writings of others at discretion. Thought is the property of him who can entertain it; and of him who can adequately place it. A certain awkwardness marks the use of borrowed thoughts; but, as soon as we have learned what to do with them, they become our own.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Many divorces are not really the result of irreparable injury but involve, instead, a desire on the part of the man or woman to shatter the setup, start out from scratch alone, and make life work for them all over again. They want the risk of disaster, want to touch bottom, see where bottom is, and, coming up, to breathe the air with relief and relish again.
    Edward Hoagland (b. 1932)

    Men have come to speak of the revelation as somewhat long ago given and done, as if God were dead. The injury to faith throttles the preacher; and the goodliest of institutions becomes an uncertain and inarticulate voice.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)