Irondequoit Bay Bridge

The Irondequoit Bay Bridge is a 2,375.36-foot (724.01 m) continuous truss bridge spanning Irondequoit Bay in eastern Monroe County, New York, in the United States. It is 87 feet (27 m) wide and carries the six-lane New York State Route 104 (NY 104) from the town of Irondequoit on the west side of the bay to the town of Webster on the bay's east side. The western approach is just east of NY 104's interchange with NY 590. The bay bridge was built in 1967, has nine spans and handles an average of 67,229 vehicles per day as of 2006.

Views from the bridge are somewhat obstructed by the concrete side barriers, especially for smaller cars.

Other articles related to "bay":

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Bay County, Florida - History
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Famous quotes containing the words bridge and/or bay:

    I was at work that morning. Someone came riding like mad
    Over the bridge and up the road—Farmer Rouf’s little lad.
    Bareback he rode; he had no hat; he hardly stopped to say,
    “Morgan’s men are coming, Frau, they’re galloping on this way.
    Constance Fenimore Woolson (1840–1894)

    Three miles long and two streets wide, the town curls around the bay ... a gaudy run with Mediterranean splashes of color, crowded steep-pitched roofs, fishing piers and fishing boats whose stench of mackerel and gasoline is as aphrodisiac to the sensuous nose as the clean bar-whisky smell of a nightclub where call girls congregate.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)