Irish House of Commons

The Irish House of Commons (Irish: Teach na nGnáthduine) was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland, that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise: in counties forty shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self electing corporations or a highly restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Roman Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote.

The British-appointed Irish executive, under the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, was not answerable to the House of Commons but to the British government. However, the Chief Secretary for Ireland was usually a member of the Irish parliament. In the Commons, business was presided over by the Speaker who, in the absence of a government chosen from and answerable to the Commons, was the dominant political figure in the parliament. The House of Commons was abolished when the Irish parliament merged with its British counterpart in 1801 under the Act of Union, forming the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The House sat for the last time in Parliament House, Dublin on 2 August 1800.

Read more about Irish House Of Commons:  Famous Members, Speakers, Constituencies, Resignation

Other articles related to "irish house of commons, house, irish house of, house of commons, irish":

Irish House Of Commons - Resignation
... They could cease to be a member of the House only by one of four ways death expulsion taking Holy Orders being awarded a peerage and so a seat in the Irish House of Lords. 1793 a methodology for resignation was created, equivalent to the Chiltern Hundreds in the British House of Commons ... Irish members could now be appointed to either the Escheatorship of Munster, the Escheatorship of Leinster, the Escheatorship of Connaught or the ...

Famous quotes containing the words commons, irish and/or house:

    [I]n Great-Britain it is said that their constitution relies on the house of commons for honesty, and the lords for wisdom; which would be a rational reliance if honesty were to be bought with money, and if wisdom were hereditary.
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    Job, of God.