Interrogation - Movement For Increased Recording of Interrogations in The US

Movement For Increased Recording of Interrogations in The US

Currently, there is a movement for mandatory electronic recording of all custodial interrogations in the United States. "Electronic recording" describes the process of recording interrogations from start to finish. This is in contrast to a "taped" or "recorded confession," which typically only includes the final statement of the suspect. "Taped interrogation" is the traditional term for this process; however, as analog is becoming less and less common, statutes and scholars are referring to the process as "electronically recording" interviews or interrogations. Alaska, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, and Wisconsin are the only states to require taped interrogation. New Jersey’s taping requirement started on January 1, 2006. Massachusetts allows jury instructions that state that the courts prefer taped interrogations. Commander Neil Nelson of the St. Paul Police Department, an expert in taped interrogation, has described taped interrogation in Minnesota as the "best thing ever rammed down our throats."

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Interrogation Techniques - Movement For Increased Recording of Interrogations in The US
... Currently, there is a movement for mandatory electronic recording of all custodial interrogations in the United States ... "Electronic recording" describes the process of recording interrogations from start to finish ... Taped interrogation" is the traditional term for this process however, as analog is becoming less and less common, statutes and scholars are referring to the process as "electronically ...

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