International Center For The History of Electronic Games

International Center For The History Of Electronic Games

The International Center for the History of Electronic Games (ICHEG) collects, studies, and interprets video games, other electronic games, and related materials and the ways in which electronic games are changing how people play, learn, and connect with each other, including across boundaries of culture and geography. Located at The Strong in Rochester, New York, USA, the International Center for the History of Electronic Games houses one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of electronic-game platforms, games, and related materials in the world (more than 37,000 items).

Originally created as a “national” center, the International Center for the History of Electronic Games changed its name in March 2010 to more accurately reflect the global impact of electronic games on society and culture.

Read more about International Center For The History Of Electronic Games:  Collections, Interpretive Activities, Access To Collections, CHEGheads Blog, Publications, Staff

Famous quotes containing the words games, electronic, center and/or history:

    Whatever games are played with us, we must play no games with ourselves, but deal in our privacy with the last honesty and truth.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Ideally, advertising aims at the goal of a programmed harmony among all human impulses and aspirations and endeavors. Using handicraft methods, it stretches out toward the ultimate electronic goal of a collective consciousness.
    Marshall McLuhan (1911–1980)

    The greatest part of each day, each year, each lifetime is made up of small, seemingly insignificant moments. Those moments may be cooking dinner...relaxing on the porch with your own thoughts after the kids are in bed, playing catch with a child before dinner, speaking out against a distasteful joke, driving to the recycling center with a week’s newspapers. But they are not insignificant, especially when these moments are models for kids.
    Barbara Coloroso (20th century)

    The history of the Victorian Age will never be written: we know too much about it.
    Lytton Strachey (1880–1932)