Insular Plate

The Insular Plate was an ancient oceanic plate that began subducting under the west-coast of North America around the early Cretaceous time. The Insular Plate had a chain of active volcanic islands that were called the Insular Islands. These volcanic Islands however collided then fused onto the west-coast of North America when the Insular Plate jammed then shut down ending the subduction zone.

Other articles related to "insular, plate, insular plate":

Coast Mountains - Geology - Origins and Growth - Insular and Omineca Arc Eruptive Periods
... These volcanic islands, known as the Insular Islands by geoscientists, were formed on a pre-existing tectonic plate called the Insular Plate by subduction of the ... to the east under an ancient ocean basin between the Insular Islands and the former continental margin of North America called the Bridge River Ocean ... As the Insular Plate drew closer to the pre-existing continental margin by ongoing subduction under the Bridge River Ocean, the Insular Islands drew closer to the former continental margin ...
Volcanology Of Canada - Western Canada - Formation of The Pacific Northwest
... Islands by geoscientists, were formed on a pre-existing tectonic plate called the Intermontane Plate about 245 million years ago by subduction of the former Insular Plate to its west during the Triassic period ... As the Intermontane Plate drew closer to the pre-existing continental margin by ongoing subduction under the Slide Mountain Ocean, the Intermontane Islands drew closer to the former ... As the North American Plate drifted west and the Intermontane Plate continued to drift east to the ancient continental margin of Western Canada, the Slide Mountain Ocean began to close by ongoing subduction under the ...

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