Institutional Economists

Institutional Economists

Institutional economics focuses on understanding the role of the evolutionary process and the role of institutions in shaping economic behaviour. Its original focus lay in Thorstein Veblen's instinct-oriented dichotomy between technology on the one side and the "ceremonial" sphere of society on the other. Its name and core elements trace back to a 1919 American Economic Review article by Walton H. Hamilton. Institutional economics emphasizes a broader study of institutions and views markets as a result of the complex interaction of these various institutions (e.g. individuals, firms, states, social norms). The earlier tradition continues today as a leading heterodox approach to economics.

A significant variant is the new institutional economics from the later 20th century, which integrates later developments of neoclassical economics into the analysis. Law and economics has been a major theme since the publication of the Legal Foundations of Capitalism by John R. Commons in 1924. Behavioral economics is another hallmark of institutional economics based on what is known about psychology and cognitive science, rather than simple assumptions of economic behavior.

Read more about Institutional Economists:  Institutional Economics, New Institutional Economics, Institutionalism Today, Criticism

Other articles related to "institutional economists, institutional":

Institutional Economists - Criticism
... In other words, institutional economics have become so popular because it means all things to all people, which in the end of the day is the meaning of ... Rather than being "institutional," Veblen, Hamilton and Ayres position is anti-institutional ...

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