Ingrian Finns

The Ingrian Finns (inkeriläiset or inkerinsuomalaiset) are the Finnish population of Ingria (now the central part of Leningrad Oblast of Russia) descending from Lutheran Finnish immigrants introduced to the area in the 17th century, when Finland and Ingria were both part of the Swedish Empire. In the forced population transfers before and after World War II they were relocated to other parts of the Soviet Union. The Ingrian Finns still constitute the largest part of the Finnish population of the Russian Federation. According to some records, some 25,000 Ingrian Finns have returned or still reside in the Saint Petersburg region.

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Forced Migration In The Soviet Union - Timeline
... Afghanistan, Turkey February–May 1935 Ingrian Finns 30,000 Leningrad Oblast (Russia) Vologda Oblast, Western Siberia, Kazakh SSR, Tajik SSR February–March 1935 ...
Soviet Ingria
... The First All-Union Census of the Soviet Union in 1926 recorded 114,831 Leningrad Finns, as Ingrian Finns were called ... the Finnic peoples living there, but in Northern Ingria Ingrian Finns formed the majority ... The situation for the Ingrian Finns deteriorated further when in the fall of 1934 the Forbidden Border Zone along the western border of the Soviet Union was established ...
Ingria In World War II - Period of The Siege
... In 1942, during the siege of Leningrad, 25,000-30,000 Ingrian Finns were deported to Siberia by the NKVD ... occupied the southern and western parts of Ingria, most of the remaining Ingrian Finns were evacuated to Finland or allowed to resettle there after petitioning the ... Later, in the summer of 1944, the Finns were pushed back to the other side of the Bay of Vyborg and the Vuoksi River ...
Ingrian Finns - Present Day
... After the dissolution of the Soviet Union about 25,000 Ingrians and their family members from Russia and Estonia have moved to Finland, where they are eligible for automatic residence permit ... In 2010 the Finnish government decided to stop the remigration and new residence seeking Ingrians will be treated the same as any other foreigner ... As many Ingrian Finns, including mixed families, who moved to Finland did not speak any language other than Russian and in many cases identify themselves as Russians, mostly ...