Information Privacy

Information privacy, or data privacy is the relationship between collection and dissemination of data, technology, the public expectation of privacy, and the legal and political issues surrounding them.

Privacy concerns exist wherever personally identifiable information is collected and stored – in digital form or otherwise. Improper or non-existent disclosure control can be the root cause for privacy issues. Data privacy issues can arise in response to information from a wide range of sources, such as:

  • Healthcare records
  • Criminal justice investigations and proceedings
  • Financial institutions and transactions
  • Biological traits, such as genetic material
  • Residence and geographic records
  • Ethnicity
  • Privacy Breach

The challenge in data privacy is to share data while protecting personally identifiable information. The fields of data security and information security design and utilize software, hardware and human resources to address this issue.

Read more about Information Privacy:  Legality, Safe Harbor Program and Passenger Name Record Issues, Protecting Privacy in Information Systems

Other articles related to "information privacy, information, privacy":

Information Privacy - Protecting Privacy in Information Systems
... As heterogeneous information systems with differing privacy rules are interconnected and information is shared, policy appliances will be required to reconcile ... There are two categories of technology to address privacy protection in commercial IT systems communication and enforcement ... Policy Communication P3P - The Platform for Privacy Preferences ...

Famous quotes containing the words privacy and/or information:

    Any moral philosophy is exceedingly rare. This of Menu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar, and at the same time, a more public and universal word, than is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Theories of child development and guidelines for parents are not cast in stone. They are constantly changing and adapting to new information and new pressures. There is no “right” way, just as there are no magic incantations that will always painlessly resolve a child’s problems.
    Lawrence Kutner (20th century)