Infant - Emotional Development

Emotional Development

Attachment theory is primarily an evolutionary and ethological theory whereby the infant or child seeks proximity to a specified attachment figure in situations of alarm or distress for the purpose of survival. The forming of attachments is considered to be the foundation of the infant/child's capacity to form and conduct relationships throughout life. Attachment is not the same as love and/or affection although they often go together. Attachment and attachment behaviors tend to develop between the age of 6 months and 3 years. Infants become attached to adults who are sensitive and responsive in social interactions with the infant, and who remain as consistent caregivers for some time. Parental responses lead to the development of patterns of attachment which in turn lead to 'internal working models' which will guide the individual's feelings, thoughts, and expectations in later relationships. There are a number of attachment 'styles' namely 'secure', 'anxious-ambivalent', 'anxious-avoidant', (all 'organized') and 'disorganized', some of which are more problematic than others. A lack of attachment or a seriously disrupted capacity for attachment could potentially amount to serious disorders.

Read more about this topic:  Infant

Other articles related to "emotional, development, emotional development":

Michael Lewis (psychologist) - Research
... His research has focused on normal and deviant emotional and intellectual development ... By focusing on the normal course of development, he has been able to articulate the sequence of developmental capacities of the child in regard to its intellectual growth and relate this to changes in the organization ... dysfunctional growth as well as normal development ...
Early Childhood Education - Developmental Domains - Psychosocial Developments - Emotional Development
... Emotional development concerns the child's increasing awareness and control of their feelings and how they react to them in a given situation ...

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