Indian Army During World War II

The Indian Army during World War II began the war, in 1939, numbering just under 200,000 men. By the end of the war it had become the largest volunteer army in history, rising to over 2.5 million men in August 1945. Serving in divisions of infantry, armour and a fledgling airborne force, they fought on three continents in Africa, Europe and Asia.

The Indian Army fought in Ethiopia against the Italian Army, in Egypt, Libya and Tunisia against both the Italian and German Army, and, after the Italian surrender, against the German Army in Italy. However, the bulk of the Indian Army was committed to fighting the Japanese Army, first during the British defeats in Malaya and the retreat from Burma to the Indian border; later, after resting and refitting for the victorious advance back into Burma, as part of the largest British Empire army ever formed. These campaigns cost the lives of over 36,000 Indian servicemen, while another 34,354 were wounded, and 67,340 became prisoners of war. Their valour was recognised with the award of some 4,000 decorations, and 38 members of the Indian Army were awarded the Victoria Cross or the George Cross.

Read more about Indian Army During World War II:  Background, Organisation, Burma, India, Victoria Cross, George Cross, Aftermath

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Indian Army During World War II - Aftermath
... World War II cost the lives of over 36,000 Indian servicemen and another 34,354 more were wounded, and 67,340 became prisoners of war ... World War II, would be the last time the Indian Army fought as the British Indian Army, as independence and partition followed in 1947 ... After partition the British Indian Army was divided between the new Indian Army and the Pakistan Army ...

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