Indian Army During World War I

The Indian Army during World War I contributed a number of divisions and independent brigades to the European, Mediterranean and the Middle east theatres of war in World War I. One million Indian troops would serve overseas, of whom 62,000 died and another 67,000 were wounded. In total 74,187 Indian soldiers died during the war.

In World War I the Indian Army fought against the German Empire in German East Africa and on the Western Front. At the First Battle of Ypres, Khudadad Khan became the first Indian to be awarded a Victoria Cross. Indian divisions were also sent to Egypt, Gallipoli and nearly 700,000 served in Mesopotamia against the Ottoman Empire. While some divisions were sent overseas others had to remain in India guarding the North West Frontier and on internal security and training duties.

Read more about Indian Army During World War I:  Kitchener's Reforms, Organization, Home Service, Indian Army Entry Into The War, Independent Brigades, Expeditionary Forces, Victoria Cross Recipients, Aftermath

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Indian Army During World War I - Aftermath
... For further information, see World War I and its aftermath and List of regiments of the Indian Army (1922) In 1919, the Indian Army could call upon 491,000 men, but there was a shortage of ... In 1921, the Indian government started a review of their military requirements with the protection of the North West Frontier and internal security their priority ... By 1925, the Army in India had been reduced to 197,000 troops, 140,000 of them Indian ...

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