I Want To Break Free

"I Want to Break Free" ( sample) is a song by the British rock band Queen, which was written by its bassist John Deacon. The song was featured on the Queen's 1984 album The Works and distributed as a single on 7-inch and 12-inch vinyl records and 3-inch and 5-inch CDs. The song had three versions: album, single and extended, differing in length by a more than a factor of 2. It was included in most live concerts by the group, in several videos, and in The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert where it was sung by Lisa Stansfield.

The song is largely known for its music video for which all the band members dressed in women's clothes, a concept proposed by Roger Taylor, which parodied the long-running British soap opera Coronation Street. The second part of the video included a composition rehearsed and performed with the Royal Ballet and choreographed by Wayne Eagling. Whereas the parody was acclaimed in the UK, it was considered controversial in the US and banned by MTV and other stations. After its release in 1984 the single of the song was well received all over Europe and South America, where it was listed within top ten and regarded as an anthem of fight against oppression. The single reached only the 45th position in the US charts, but reached number 3 in the UK and was certified gold with 400,000+ copies sold.

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Other articles related to "i want to break free":

The Works (Queen album) - Song Information - I Want To Break Free
... "I Want to Break Free" was written by John Deacon out of frustration ... This pop song is best known probably because of its controversial video, featuring all four Queen members dressed up as women, in a parody of the British soap opera Coronation Street ...

Famous quotes containing the words free and/or break:

    Who are we? And for what are we going to fight? Are we the titled slaves of George the Third? The military conscripts of Napoleon the Great? Or the frozen peasants of the Russian Czar? No—we are the free born sons of America; the citizens of the only republic now existing in the world; and the only people on earth who possess rights, liberties, and property which they dare call their own.
    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

    Spread outward. Crack the round dome. Break through.
    Have liberty not as the air within a grave
    Or down a well. Breathe freedom, oh, my native,
    In the space of horizons that neither love nor hate.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)