Hydraulic Engineers

Hydraulic Engineers

This article is about about civil engineering. For the mechanical engineering discipline, see Hydraulic machinery.
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Hydraulic engineering as a sub-discipline of civil engineering is concerned with the flow and conveyance of fluids, principally water and sewage. One feature of these systems is the extensive use of gravity as the motive force to cause the movement of the fluids. This area of civil engineering is intimately related to the design of bridges, dams, channels, canals, and levees, and to both sanitary and environmental engineering.

Hydraulic engineering is the application of fluid mechanics principles to problems dealing with the collection, storage, control, transport, regulation, measurement, and use of water. Before beginning a hydraulic engineering project, one must figure out how much water is involved. The hydraulic engineer is concerned with the transport of sediment by the river, the interaction of the water with its alluvial boundary, and the occurrence of scour and deposition. "The hydraulic engineer actually develops conceptual designs for the various features which interact with water such as spillways and outlet works for dams, culverts for highways, canals and related structures for irrigation projects, and cooling-water facilities for thermal power plants."

Read more about Hydraulic Engineers:  Fundamental Principles, Applications, History, Modern Times

Other articles related to "hydraulic engineers, hydraulic, hydraulic engineer, engineers":

Hydraulic Engineers - Modern Times
... In many respects the fundamentals of hydraulic engineering haven't changed since ancient times ... from ancient times and the role of the hydraulic engineer is a critical one in supplying it ... However, most flows are dominated by viscous effects, so engineers of the 17th and 18th centuries found the inviscid flow solutions unsuitable, and by experimentation they developed ...