House of Árpád

House Of Árpád

The Árpáds or Arpads (Hungarian: Árpádok, Croatian: Arpadovići, Serbian: Арпадовци/Arpadovci, Slovak: Arpádovci, Turkish: Arpatlar) was the ruling dynasty of the Principality of Hungary (9th–10th centuries) and of the Kingdom of Hungary (1000–1301). The dynasty was named after Grand Prince Árpád who was the head of the Hungarian tribal federation during the conquest of the Carpathian Basin, c. 895. It is also referred to as Turul dynasty.

Both the first Grand Prince of the Hungarians (Álmos) and the first King of Hungary (Saint Stephen) were members of the dynasty.

Seven members of the dynasty were canonized or beatified by the Roman Catholic Church; therefore, the dynasty has been often referred to as the "Kindred of the Holy Kings" from the 13th century. Two Árpáds were canonized by the Eastern Orthodox Church.

The dynasty came to end in 1301 with the death of King Andrew III of Hungary, while the last member of the House of Árpad, Andrew's daughter, Blessed Elizabeth of Töss, died in 1336 or 1338. All of the subsequent kings of Hungary (with the exception of King Matthias Corvinus) were cognatic descendants of the Árpáds dynasty. The Croy family and the Drummond family of Scotland claim to descend from Princes Geza and George, sons of medieval Hungarian kings: Geza II and Andrew I, respectively.

Read more about House Of Árpád:  9th–10th Centuries, 11th Century, 12th Century, 13th Century, Dynasty Tree, Saints

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