Hot Water Extraction

The Hot Water Extraction (HWE) method, is a method used in chemistry for extraction and for "steam cleaning" (e.g. carpets. as listed by the IICRC to be the primary method for cleaning carpets. Residential, and Commercial). The pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) process uses a combination of high water pressure for agitation, and hot water to increase reaction rate.

Read more about Hot Water Extraction"Steam Cleaning"

Other articles related to "hot water extraction, water, hot water":

Carpet Cleaning - Hot Water Extraction Vs Steam Cleaning
... cleaning, "steam cleaning" is usually a misnomer for or mischaracterization of the hot water extraction cleaning method ... The hot water extraction cleaning method uses equipment that sprays heated water (not steam), sometimes with added cleaning chemicals, on the carpet while simultaneously vacuuming the sprayed water along with ... Many carpet manufacturers recommend professional hot water extraction as the most effective carpet cleaning method ...
Hot Water Extraction - "Steam Cleaning"
... process, apart from steam that may escape incidentally from hot water ... For instance, in a modern truck-mounted carpet cleaning machine, water can be heated to 300+ degrees (F), but after passing through high pressure steel braided hose and several manifolds, the water loses much of its ...

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