History of Writing

The history of writing records the development of expressing language by letters or other marks. In the history of how systems of representation of language through graphic means have evolved in different human civilizations, more complete writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, systems of ideographic and/or early mnemonic symbol. True writing, in which the entire content of a linguistic utterance is encoded so that another reader can reconstruct, with a fair degree of accuracy, the exact utterance written down, is a later development, and is distinguished from proto-writing which typically avoids encoding grammatical words and affixes, making it difficult or impossible to confidently reconstruct the exact meaning intended by the writer unless a great deal of context is already known in advance. One of the earliest forms of written expression is cuneiform.

Read more about History Of Writing:  Inventions of Writing, Writing Systems, Recorded History, Materials of Writing

Other articles related to "history of writing, writings, writing, of writing, history of":

History of Writing - Dacia (Romania)
... The origin and the timing of the writings are widely disputed, because there are no precise evidence in situ, the slabs cannot be carbon dated, because of the bad ... However, the presence of influences of Greek, Phoenician and Etruscan in the writings, make it unlikely that they date from this period ...
History Of Writing - Materials of Writing
... Main article Writing material There is no very definite statement as to the material which was in most common use for the purposes of writing at start of the early writing systems ... of the record and accordingly, in the very commencement of the national history of Israel, it is read of the two tables of the law written in stone, and of a subsequent writing of the law on stone ... stamped coins, are mentioned as a material of writing they include lead, brass, and gold ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, writing and/or history:

    It is remarkable how closely the history of the apple tree is connected with that of man.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    One of the few things I know about writing is this: spend it all, shoot it, play it, lose it, all, right away, every time. Do not hoard what seems good for a later place in the book, or for another book; give it, give it all, give it now.
    Annie Dillard (b. 1945)

    You treat world history as a mathematician does mathematics, in which nothing but laws and formulas exist, no reality, no good and evil, no time, no yesterday, no tomorrow, nothing but an eternal, shallow, mathematical present.
    Hermann Hesse (1877–1962)