History of Wound Care

The history of wound care spans from prehistory to modern medicine. As wounds naturally heal by themselves, regardless of whether recovery from the scar or recovery from lost body tissue was a possibility, hunter-gatherers would have noticed several factors and certain herbal remedies would speed up or assist the process, especially if it was grievous. In ancient history, this was followed by the realisation of the necessity of hygiene and the halting of bleeding, where wound dressing techniques and surgery developed. Eventually the germ theory of disease also assisted in improving wound care. Many advances in wound treatment are now available in all forms of Health Care: from wet to dry dressings, Ag Alginate to the more technical Woundvac.

Read more about History Of Wound Care:  Ancient Medical Practice, 19th Century, Wound-site Dressing

Other articles related to "history of wound care, of wound care, wounds, wound":

History Of Wound Care - Wound-site Dressing - 1950s Onward
... which researchers and doctors in the field of wound care could explore better protecting of healing wounds and even accelerating the natural wound healing process ... Howard Maibach reported on the superior efficacy of moist wound dressings ... The adoption of moist wound dressing technique as recommended best wound dressing practice reflected a large advance in approach producing markedly superior clinical outcomes ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, care, history and/or wound:

    Racism is an ism to which everyone in the world today is exposed; for or against, we must take sides. And the history of the future will differ according to the decision which we make.
    Ruth Benedict (1887–1948)

    And what do I care if she marries another? every other night I dream of her dresses and things on an endless clothesline of bliss, in a ceaseless wind of possession, and her husband shall never learn what I do to the silks and fleece of the dancing witch. This is love’s supreme accomplishment. I am happy—yes, happy! What more can I do to prove it, how to proclaim that I am happy? Oh, to shout it so that all of you believe me at last, you cruel, smug people.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)

    ... the history of the race, from infancy through its stages of barbarism, heathenism, civilization, and Christianity, is a process of suffering, as the lower principles of humanity are gradually subjected to the higher.
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800–1878)

    The sorrow for the dead is the only sorrow from which we refuse to be divorced. Every other wound we seek to heal—every other affliction to forget: but this wound we consider it a duty to keep open—this affliction we cherish and brood over in solitude.
    Washington Irving (1783–1859)