History of Tyne and Wear

History Of Tyne And Wear

Tyne and Wear /ˌtaɪn ən ˈwɪər/ is a metropolitan county in North East region of England around the mouths of the Rivers Tyne and Wear. It came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. It consists of the five metropolitan boroughs of South Tyneside, North Tyneside, City of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead and the City of Sunderland.

Prior to reforms in 1974, the territory comprising the county of Tyne and Wear straddled the border between the counties of Northumberland and County Durham. North Tyneside and Newcastle upon Tyne had previously existed within of Northumberland, whereas South Tyneside, Gateshead and Sunderland were all previously within the borders of County Durham, with the River Tyne forming the border of the two counties.

Tyne and Wear is bounded on the east by the North Sea, and as a ceremonial county, shares borders with Northumberland to the north and County Durham to the south.

Tyne and Wear County Council was abolished in 1986, and so its districts (the metropolitan boroughs) are now unitary authorities. However, the metropolitan county continues to exist in law and as a geographic frame of reference.

Read more about History Of Tyne And Wear:  History, Local Government, Politics, Settlements, Places of Interest

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History Of Tyne And Wear - Places of Interest
... crosses boundary into Derwentside) The Sage Gateshead Newcastle upon Tyne Discovery Museum (previously Museum of Science Engineering) Hadrian's Wall Hancock Museum Jesmond Dene public park ...

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