History of The Pacific Northwest

History Of The Pacific Northwest

The Pacific Northwest is a region in western North America bounded by the Pacific Ocean to the west and, loosely, by the Rocky Mountains on the east. Though no universally agreed upon boundary exists, a common conception includes the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington and the Canadian province of British Columbia. Broader conceptions reach north into Alaska and Yukon, south into the coastal and mountainous regions of Northern California, and east into Idaho, western Montana, and western Wyoming to the Continental Divide. Narrower conceptions may be limited to the Northwestern U.S. or to the coastal areas west of the Cascade and Coast mountains. The variety of definitions can be attributed to partially overlapping commonalities of the region's history, geography, society, and other factors.

The Northwest Coast is the coastal regions of the Pacific Northwest and the Northwest Plateau (also commonly known as "The Interior" in British Columbia and the Inland Empire in the United States) is the inland regions. The term "Pacific Northwest" should not be confused with the Northwest Territory (also known as the Great Northwest, a historic term in the United States) or the Northwest Territories of Canada.

The region's largest metropolitan areas are Seattle/Tacoma, Washington, with 3.4 million people; Vancouver, British Columbia, with 2.4 million people; and the Portland metropolitan area, with 2.2 million people.

A key aspect of the Pacific Northwest is the US–Canada international border, which the United States and the United Kingdom established at a time when the region's inhabitants were still overwhelmingly Indigenous Americans. The border — in two sections, along the 49th parallel south of British Columbia and the Alaska Panhandle west of northern British Columbia — has had a powerful effect on the region. According to Canadian historian Ken Coates, the border has not merely influenced the Pacific Northwest—rather, "the region's history and character have been determined by the boundary".

Read more about History Of The Pacific Northwest:  Definition, Geology, Geography, Climate, Ecoregions, Population, Largest Cities By Population in The Pacific Northwest, Politics, Economy, Education, Culture

Other articles related to "pacific, history of the pacific northwest, the pacific northwest, pacific northwest":

Games Created By Koei - Strategy Games
... Pacific Theater of Operations P.T.O ... II Pacific Theater of Operations P.T.O ... IV Pacific Theater of Operations Naval Ops Warship Gunner 2 Nobunaga's Ambition series - published on various platforms ...
2007 Pacific Hurricane Season
... The 2007 Pacific hurricane season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation ... It officially started on May 15, 2007 in the eastern Pacific, designated as the area east of 140°W, and on June 1, 2007 in the central Pacific, which ... These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Pacific basin ...
2007 Pacific Hurricane Season - Seasonal Forecasts
... Predictions of tropical activity in the 2007 season for the Eastern North Pacific Source Date Named storms Hurricanes Major hurricanes NOAA Average 15.3 8.8 4.2 NOAA 22 May 12 ... – 6 ... – 2 ... – 4 Actual ... a below-normal level of activity in the Eastern Pacific, with 12 to 16 named storms, of which 6 to 9 were expected to become hurricanes, and 2 to 4 expected to become major hurricanes ... The Central Pacific basin was also expected to be below average, with only two to three tropical cyclones expected to form or cross into the area ...
2007 Pacific Hurricane Season - Storm Names
... The following names were used for named storms that formed in the northeast Pacific in 2007 ... York (unused) Zelda (unused) For the central Pacific Ocean, four consecutive lists are used, with the names used sequentially until exhausted, rather than until the end of the year ... No central pacific names were used the next one used would have been Kika ...
History Of The Pacific Northwest - Culture - Spirituality and Religion
... The Pacific Northwest has the lowest rate of church attendance in the United States and consistently reports the highest percentage of atheism this is most pronounced ... Religion plays a smaller part in Pacific Northwest politics than in the rest of the United States ... Political conservatives in the Pacific Northwest tend to identify more strongly with free-market libertarian values than they do with more religious social conservatives ...

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