History of The Hippie Movement

History Of The Hippie Movement

The hippie subculture developed as a youth movement that began in the United States during the early 1960s and spread around the world. Its origins can be traced back to classical culture, and to European social movements in the early 20th century i.e.: Fabians and Bohemians. From around 1967, its fundamental ethos — including harmony with nature, communal living, artistic experimentation particularly in music, and the widespread use of recreational drugs — spread around the world.

Read more about History Of The Hippie Movement:  1968, 1970-present

Other articles related to "history of the hippie movement, hippie, hippies":

History Of The Hippie Movement - 1970-present - Festivals
... The tradition of hippie festivals began in the United States in 1965 with Ken Kesey's Acid Tests, where the Grateful Dead played under the influence of LSD and initiated psychedelic jamming ... For the next several decades, many hippies and neo-hippies became part of the Deadhead and Phish Head communities, attending music and art festivals held around the country ... demise of the Grateful Dead and Phish, the nomadic touring hippies have been left without a main jam band to follow ...

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