History of Science in Early Cultures

The history of science in early cultures refers to the study of protoscience in ancient history, prior to the development of science in the Middle Ages. In prehistoric times, advice and knowledge was passed from generation to generation in an oral tradition. The development of writing enabled knowledge to be stored and communicated across generations with much greater fidelity. Combined with the development of agriculture, which allowed for a surplus of food, it became possible for early civilizations to develop and more time to be devoted to tasks other than survival, such as the search for knowledge for knowledge's sake.

Read more about History Of Science In Early Cultures:  Greco-Roman World, India, China and The Far East

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History Of Science In Early Cultures - China and The Far East
... However, Needham and most scholars recognised that cultural factors prevented these Chinese achievements from developing into what might be considered "modern science". ...

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