Historical Ethnic Groups of Europe

Historical Ethnic Groups Of Europe

The ethnic groups in Europe are the various ethnic groups that reside in the nations of Europe. European ethnology is the field of anthropology focusing on Europe.

Pan and Pfeil (2004) count 87 distinct "peoples of Europe", of which 33 form the majority population in at least one sovereign state, while the remaining 54 constitute ethnic minorities. The total number of national minority populations in Europe is estimated at 105 million people, or 14% of 770 million Europeans.

There is no precise or universally accepted definition of the terms "ethnic group" or "nationality". In the context of European ethnography in particular, the terms ethnic group, people (without nation state), nationality, national minority, ethnic minority, linguistic community, linguistic group and linguistic minority are used as mostly synonymous, although preference may vary in usage with respect to the situation specific to the individual countries of Europe.

Read more about Historical Ethnic Groups Of Europe:  Overview, Linguistic Classifications, By Country, National Minorities, Ethnic Minorities of Non-European Origin

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Historical Ethnic Groups Of Europe - European Identity - Pan-European Identity
... is an emerging sense of personal identification with Europe, or the European Union as a result of the gradual process European integration taking place over the ... From the later 20th century, 'Europe' has come to be widely used as a synonym for the European Union even though there are millions of people living on the European continent in non-EU states ... The prefix pan implies that the identity applies throughout Europe, and especially in an EU context, and 'pan-European' is often contrasted with national identity ...

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