Hippias

Hippias

Hippias of Elis ( /ˈhɪpiəs/; Greek: Ἱππίας; late 5th century BCE) was a Greek Sophist, and a contemporary of Socrates. With an assurance characteristic of the later sophists, he claimed to be regarded as an authority on all subjects, and lectured on poetry, grammar, history, politics, mathematics, and much else. Most of our knowledge of him is derived from Plato, who characterizes him as vain and arrogant.

Read more about Hippias:  Life, Work

Other articles related to "hippias":

Hippias Minor - A Conversation About Lies - Introductory Scene
... The sophist Hippias is visiting Athens from his home city of Elis on the occasion of the Olympic festival ... Hippias most recent display of oratory concerned who is the better man, Achilles or Odysseus ... are separated from the crowd, Socrates, encouraged by Eudicus, quizzes Hippias on the particulars of his opinion ...
Hippias - Work
... Hippias was a man of very extensive knowledge, and he occupied himself not only with rhetorical, philosophical, and political studies, but was also well versed in poetry, music ... ignorance, is the main cause which provoked Plato to his severe criticism of Hippias, as the sophist enjoyed a very extensive reputation, and thus had a large influence upon ... A mathematical discovery ascribed to Hippias is sometimes called the quadratrix of Hippias ...
Peisistratos - Legacy
... He was succeeded by his eldest son, Hippias ... Hippias and his brother, Hipparchus, ruled the city much akin to the way that their father did ... against Hipparchus conceived by Harmodius and Aristogeiton, Hippias became paranoid and oppressive ...
Hippias Major
... Hippias Major (or What is Beauty? or Greater Hippias, to distinguish it from the Hippias Minor, which has the same chief character) is one of the dialogues of Plato ... In the Hippias Major, Socrates and Hippias set out to find a definition for "beauty", but are destined to fail due to their inability to formulate an answer which encompasses the entire concept ... of "Beauty." As in Charmides, Lysis and Euthyphro, Hippias Major has an "anatreptic" or self-defeating virtue, that is the purpose of the author is to defeat commonly held opinions ...
Hippias Minor - A Conversation About Lies - Debate and Athletics Compared - Justice Is Power and Knowledge
... Socrates convinces Hippias that Justice is a matter of both power and knowledge, and that the powerful (i.e ... The dialogue ends with Hippias' incredulity and helplessness at Socrates' verbal dexterity ... Socrates tells Hippias that he does not agree with himself, and is perplexed about his own conclusion ...