Hindu Calendar - Months of The Lunisolar Calendar - Religious Observances in Case of Extra and Lost Months

Religious Observances in Case of Extra and Lost Months

Among normal months, adhika months, and kshaya months, the earlier are considered "better" for religious purposes. That means, if a festival should fall on the 10th tithi of the Āshvayuja month (this is called Vijayadashamī) and there are two Āśvayuja (Āśvina)' months caused by the existence of an adhika Āśvayuja, the first adhika month will not see the festival, and the festival will be observed only in the second nija month. However, if the second month is āshvayuja kshaya then the festival will be observed in the first adhika month itself.

When two months are rolled into one in the case of a kshaya māsa, the festivals of both months will also be rolled into this Kṣaya Māsa'. For example, the festival of Mahāshivarātri which is to be observed on the fourteenth tithi of the Māgha Kṛṣṇa-Pakṣa was, in 1983, observed on the corresponding tithi of Pauṣa-Māgha Kṣaya Kṛṣṇa-Pakṣa, since in that year, Pauṣa and Māgha were rolled into one, as mentioned above. When two months are rolled into one in the case of a Kṣaya Māsa, the festivals of both months will also be rolled into this kṣaya māsa.

Read more about this topic:  Hindu Calendar, Months of The Lunisolar Calendar

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