High Dynamic Range Rendering

In high dynamic range rendering (HDRR or HDR rendering), also known as high dynamic range lighting, is the rendering of computer graphics scenes by using lighting calculations done in a larger dynamic range. This allows preservation of details that may be lost due to limiting contrast ratios. Video games and computer-generated movies and special effects benefit from this as it creates more realistic scenes than with the more simplistic lighting models used.

Graphics processor company Nvidia summarizes the motivation for HDRR in three points: bright things can be really bright, dark things can be really dark, and details can be seen in both.

Read more about High Dynamic Range RenderingHistory, Examples, Applications in Computer Entertainment

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Half-Life 2: Lost Coast - Development - High Dynamic Range Rendering
... The goal of Lost Coast was to demonstrate the new high dynamic range (HDR) rendering implemented into the Source game engine ... Valve first attempted to implement HDR rendering in Source in late 2003 ... enable light bouncing and global illumination to be taken into account in the rendering ...

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