Heuristic

Heuristic ( /hjʉˈrɪstɨk/; or /hyoo-ris-tik/; Greek: "Εὑρίσκω", "find" or "discover") refers to experience-based techniques for problem solving, learning, and discovery. Where the exhaustive search is impractical, heuristic methods are used to speed up the process of finding a satisfactory solution. Examples of this method include using a rule of thumb, an educated guess, an intuitive judgment, or common sense.

In more precise terms, heuristics are strategies using readily accessible, though loosely applicable, information to control problem solving in human beings and machines.

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Other articles related to "heuristic, heuristics":

Shifting Bottleneck Heuristic
... The Shifting Bottleneck Heuristic is a procedure intended to minimize the time it takes to do work, or specifically, the makespan in a job shop ... This heuristic, or 'rule of thumb' procedure minimises the effect of the bottleneck ... The Shifting Bottleneck Heuristic is intended for job shops with a finite number of jobs and a finite number of machines ...
Heuristic - Engineering
... In engineering, a heuristic is an experience-based method that can be used as an aid to solve process design problems, varying from size of equipment to operating ... By using heuristics, time can be reduced when solving problems ... Because heuristics are fallible, it is important to understand their limitations ...
Scarcity Heuristic - Context
... Heuristics are strategies that use readily accessible though loosely applicable information to control problem solving ... We use heuristics to speed up our decision- making process when an exhaustive, deliberative process is perceived to be impractical or unnecessary ... Thus heuristics are simple, efficient rules, which have developed through either evolutionary proclivities or past learning ...
Scarcity Heuristic
... In human psychology, the scarcity heuristic is a mental shortcut that places a value on an item based on how easily it might be lost, especially to competitors ... The scarcity heuristic stems from the idea that more difficult it is to acquire an item the more value that item has ... In other situations, the scarcity heuristic can lead to systemic errors or cognitive bias ...