Heidelberg Castle

Heidelberg Castle (in German: Heidelberger Schloss) is a famous ruin in Germany and landmark of Heidelberg. The castle ruins are among the most important Renaissance structures north of the Alps.

The castle has only been partially rebuilt since its demolition in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is located 80 metres (260 ft) up the northern part of the Königstuhl hillside, and thereby dominates the view of the old downtown. It is served by an intermediate station on the Heidelberger Bergbahn funicular railway that runs from Heidelberg's Kornmarkt to the summit of the Königstuhl.

The earliest castle structure was built before AD 1214 and later expanded into 2 castles circa 1294; however, in 1537, a lightning-bolt destroyed the upper castle. The present structures had been expanded by 1650, before damage by later wars and fires. In 1764, another lightning-bolt destroyed some rebuilt sections.


Other articles related to "heidelberg castle, heidelberg, castle":

Heidelberg Castle - Before Destruction - Upper Prince's Fountain
... kept the special water wagon, that drove to Heidelberg daily and that brought water out of the Prince's Fountains to the castle ... of the court financed this transport of water from Heidelberg to Mannheim ... In the princely residence, until 1777 there was a court position titled "Heidelberg Water-filler" ...
Heidelberger Bergbahn - Lower Section
... the section was rebuilt and new cars provided in order to handle the volume of traffic to Heidelberg Castle at this time new stations were built at Kornmarkt and Heidelberg Castle ... and replaced by new and larger cars to a modern design, and Kornmarkt and Heidelberg Castle stations were again rebuilt ...

Famous quotes containing the word castle:

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