Heavy Twin Machine

Some articles on machine, heavy twin machine:

Ouvrage Restefond - Description
... Block 1 (unfinished entry) one machine gun cloche and one heavy twin machine gun embrasure ... Block 2 (infantry block) one machine gun cloche and two 81mm mortar embrasures ... Block 3 (infantry block) one machine gun cloche and one heavy twin machine gun embrasure ...
Ouvrage Flaut - Description
... Block 1 (entry) one machine gun cloche, one grenade launcher cloche and one machine gun/47mm anti-tank gun embrasure ... Block 2 (artillery) one machine gun cloche and two 81mm mortar embrasures ... Block 3 (artillery) one machine gun cloche, two heavy twin machine gun cloches, one observation cloche and two 76mm gun embrasures ...
Ouvrage Saint-Antoine - Description
... Block 1 (artillery) two machine gun cloches, two 75mm gun embrasures and four 81mm mortar embrasures ... Block 2 (infantry) one observation gun cloche and two heavy twin machine embrasures ... Block 3 (entry) one machine gun embrasure and one heavy twin machine gun/47mm anti-tank gun embrasure ...

Famous quotes containing the words machine, heavy and/or twin:

    A multitude of little superfluous precautions engender here a population of deputies and sub-officials, each of whom acquits himself with an air of importance and a rigorous precision, which seemed to say, though everything is done with much silence, “Make way, I am one of the members of the grand machine of state.”
    Marquis De Custine (1790–1857)

    One story recounts that a Tennessean, after a single day in the then almost impenetrable tangle of cypress, briars, and canebreaks, pestered by myriads of mosquitoes, and bogged in the heavy gumbo mud, declared: “Arkansas is not part of the world for which Jesus Christ died—I want none of it.”
    —Administration in the State of Arka, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    If they be two, they are two so
    As stiff twin compasses are two;
    Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show
    To move, but doth if th’ other do.
    John Donne (1572–1631)