Heavy Lift Ship

A heavy lift ship is a vessel designed to move very large loads that cannot be handled by normally equipped ships. They are of two types: semi-submerging vessels capable of lifting another ship out of the water and transporting it; and vessels that augment unloading facilities at inadequately equipped ports.

Read more about Heavy Lift ShipHistory, Submerging Types

Other articles related to "heavy lift ship, ship, ships, heavy lift ships":

USS Impervious (AM-449) - Persian Gulf War Service
... She was loaded aboard the Dutch heavy lift ship Super Servant 3 on 19 August 1990 at Norfolk along with USS Leader (MSO-490), USS Adroit (MSO-509) and USS Avenger (MCM-1) ... She was loaded aboard the Dutch heavy lift ship Super Servant 3 on 19 August 1990 at Norfolk along with USS Impervious (MSO-449), USS Adroit (MSO-509) and USS Avenger (MCM-1 ... The explosion ripped a 16 by 20 ft hole in the ship's hull and injured four sailors ...
Heavy Lift Ship - Submerging Types
... have transported many oil drilling rigs (flo/flo ships can carry the rigs from their construction site to a drilling site at roughly three to four times the speed of a self-deploying rig) ... Navy has used such ships to bring two damaged warships back to the United States for repair ... Navy has also chartered other heavy lift ships to carry smaller craft, usually mine-countermeasure craft, or other patrol craft ...

Famous quotes containing the words ship, heavy and/or lift:

    You live on hopes, I guess. You always dream that someday you might have a lot of money, your ship might come in. But if the ship doesn’t come in, I’m going to work as long as I can.
    Marion Gray (b. c. 1914)

    What sport shall we devise here in this garden
    To drive away the heavy thought of care?
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    If in madness of delusion, anyone shall lift his parricidal hand against this blessed union ... the arms of thousands will be raised to save it, and the curse of millions will fall upon the head which may have plotted its destruction.
    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)