Heat Setting

Some articles on heat setting, heat, setting:

Heatsetting
... Heat setting is a term used in the textile industry to describe a thermal process taking place mostly in either a steam atmosphere or a dry heat environment ... Very often, heat setting is also used to improve attributes for subsequent processes ... Heat setting can influence or even eliminate this tendency to undesirable torquing ...
Finishing (textiles) - Special Finishes For Synthetic Fibers
... Heat-setting of synthetic fabrics eliminates the internal tensions within the fiber, generated during manufacturing, and the new state can be fixed by rapid cooling ... This heat setting fixes the fabrics in the relaxed state, and thus avoids subsequent shrinkage or creasing of the fabric ... Presetting of goods makes it possible to use higher temperature for setting without considering the sublimation properties of dyes and also has a favorable effect on dyeing behavior ...
Heatsetting - Process Description (exemplary With The Power-Heat-Set Process)
... In the Power-Heat-Set process yarn is heat set with superheated steam in an open system at atmospheric pressure ... pulled off the packages and entered into the heat setting process ... The heat setting process takes place at temperatures between 110 °C and 200 °C in a steam-air-mix ...

Famous quotes containing the words setting and/or heat:

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