Headley Grange - Early History

Early History

Built in 1795, Headley Grange is a three-storey stone structure which was originally used as a workhouse for the poor, infirm and orphaned. It was the centre of a well-publicised riot in 1830, which is the subject of a 2002 book by local author, John Owen Smith, entitled One Monday in November - The Story of the Selborne and Headley Workhouse Riots of 1830. In 1870, the building was bought by builder Thomas Kemp for £420, who converted it into a private residence and named it Headley Grange.

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