Hd Video

Some articles on video, hd video, hd:

History Of The Single-lens Reflex Camera - Chronology - 21st Century
... Had a secondary CCD sensor to send a live video feed to a swiveling 2.5-inch (64 mm) color LCD panel (normally used for camera function data) and allow its use as an auxiliary viewfinder when the. 2008 Nikon D90 (Japan) first digital SLR with high definition video recording capability ... sensor with secondary 1280×720 pixel (720p), 24 frames per second HD video capture with monaural sound for five minutes in September ...
Canon Power Shot S50 - Models - Compact S Series
... Includes new 43 HD Movie (1024x768) Mode Bears similarity to later Powershot G series models such as G10 G11 S90 September 2009 10.0 MP 3648×2736 1/1.7" CCD 28–105 mm (3.8×) f/2.0–4 ... HD movie feature removed ... models S95 August 2010 99.8 × 58.4 × 29.5 170 Hybrid IS, 720p HD video ...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 Features - Multi-Aspect Ratio Sensor
... sensor concept pioneered in the Lumix DMC-LX3, the HD video capable GH1 was designed around a much larger four thirds sized sensor (about four times more area) a unique 14 ... The GH1 records HD video in a true 169 native image aspect ratio, and not a cropped portion of 43 or 32 HD video image ... and its successor Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 hybrid still/video camera ...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 Features
... Lumix DMC-GH1 was marketed as a new class of "Creative HD Hybrid" camera, and as Panasonic's top-of-the-line Micro Four Thirds (MFT) system camera ... standard, which includes High Definition (HD) video capability ... but perhaps even more importantly full HD video, including manual controls over many video functions ...

Famous quotes containing the word video:

    It is among the ranks of school-age children, those six- to twelve-year-olds who once avidly filled their free moments with childhood play, that the greatest change is evident. In the place of traditional, sometimes ancient childhood games that were still popular a generation ago, in the place of fantasy and make- believe play . . . today’s children have substituted television viewing and, most recently, video games.
    Marie Winn (20th century)