Harper Perennial


Harper Perennial is a paperback imprint of the publishing house HarperCollins Publishers. Harper Perennial has divisions located in New York, London, Toronto, and Sydney. The imprint is descended from the Perennial Library imprint founded by Harper & Row in 1964. In Fall of 2005, Harper Perennial rebranded with a new logo (an Olive) and a distinct editorial direction emphasizing fiction and non-fiction from new and young authors. In the end matter, books often feature a brand-specific P.S. section that features extra material such as interviews, essays, etc. Carrie Kania is the publisher.

Recent notable books include I Am Not Myself These Days by Josh Kilmer-Purcell, The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany, The Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwartz, Lullabies for Little Criminals by Heather O'Neil, Grab On to Me Tightly as If I Knew the Way by Bryan Charles, and The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon. In November, 2011, they released The Shakespeare Guide to Italy: Retracing the Bard's Unknown Travels by Richard Paul Roe, a detailed examination of the locales mentioned in ten plays by Shakespeare.

Harper Perennial Modern Classics, a direct offshoot of the imprint, publishes eminent authors such as Peter Singer, Harper Lee, Zora Neale Hurston, Aldous Huxley, Russell Banks, Thomas Pynchon, Milan Kundera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Sylvia Plath, and Thornton Wilder among many others.

Other articles related to "harper perennial":

Dennis Cooper - Other Books
... Grove Press, 2005) Ugly Man (short fiction, Harper Perennial, 2009) French Hole, being 15 outtakes from 'The Marbled Swarm' (Kiddiepunk, 2011) The Marbled Swarm (novel, Harper Perennial, November ...
Smith Magazine - Books Published
... Harper Perennial, 2008 ... Harper Perennial, 2008 ... Harper Perennial, January 2009 ...

Famous quotes containing the words perennial and/or harper:

    Today, supremely, it behooves us to remember that a nation shall be saved by the power that sleeps in its own bosom; or by none; shall be renewed in hope, in confidence, in strength by waters welling up from its own sweet, perennial springs. Not from above; not by patronage of its aristocrats. The flower does not bear the root, but the root the flower.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    ... in every State there are more women who can read and write than the whole number of illiterate male voters; more white women who can read and write than all Negro voters; more American women who can read and write than all foreign voters.
    —National Woman Suffrage Association. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 13, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)