Hannah Van Buren

Hannah Van Buren

Hannah Hoes Van Buren (née Hoes; March 8, 1783 – February 5, 1819) was the wife of the eighth United States President, Martin Van Buren.

Martin, aged 24, and Hannah, aged 23, married on February 21, 1807 at the home of the bride's sister in Catskill, New York. They had been childhood sweethearts and were first cousins once removed through his mother.

Read more about Hannah Van BurenEarly Years

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Famous quotes containing the words van buren, buren and/or van:

    “Mr. Van Buren, your friends may be leaving you—but my friends never leave me.”
    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

    There is no end to the undeserved misery and mischief it could create.
    —Abigail Van Buren (b. 1918)

    Upon entering my vein, the drug would start a warm edge that would surge along until the brain consumed it in a gentle explosion. It began in the back of the neck and rose rapidly until I felt such pleasure that the world sympathizing took on a soft, lofty appeal.
    —Gus Van Sant, U.S. screenwriter and director, and Dan Yost. Bob Hughes (Matt Dillon)