Hancock Lee Jackson

Hancock Lee Jackson (May 12, 1796 – March 19, 1876) was an American lawyer and politician. As Lieutenant Governor he became the 13th Governor of Missouri in 1857, taking office after previous Democratic Governor Trusten Polk resigned on February 27, 1857. Jackson was succeeded by fellow Democrat Robert Marcellus Stewart. Receiving the support of one faction of the Democratic Party in the 1860 gubernatorial election, this Jackson finished third in a race won by Claiborne Fox Jackson (no relation).

Jackson was born in 1796 in Richmond, Kentucky, and died in 1876 in Salem, Oregon.

Political offices
Preceded by
Wilson Brown
Lieutenant Governor of Missouri
1857–1861
Succeeded by
Thomas Caute Reynolds
Preceded by
Trusten Polk
Governor of Missouri
1857
Succeeded by
Robert M. Stewart
Governors and Lieutenant Governors of Missouri
Governors
  • McNair
  • Bates
  • Williams
  • Miller
  • Dunklin
  • Boggs
  • Reynolds
  • M. Marmaduke
  • Edwards
  • King
  • Price
  • Polk
  • H. Jackson
  • Stewart
  • C. Jackson
  • Gamble
  • Hall
  • Fletcher
  • McClurg
  • Brown
  • Woodson
  • Hardin
  • Phelps
  • Crittenden
  • J. Marmaduke
  • Morehouse
  • Francis
  • Stone
  • Stephens
  • Dockery
  • Folk
  • Hadley
  • Major
  • Gardner
  • Hyde
  • Baker
  • Caulfield
  • Park
  • Stark
  • Donnell
  • Donnelly
  • Smith
  • Donnelly
  • Blair
  • Dalton
  • Hearnes
  • Bond
  • Teasdale
  • Bond
  • Ashcroft
  • Carnahan
  • Wilson
  • Holden
  • Blunt
  • Nixon


Lieutenant
Governors
  • Ashley
  • Reeves
  • Dunklin
  • Boggs
  • Cannon
  • Marmaduke
  • Young
  • Price
  • Brown
  • Jackson
  • Reynolds
  • Hall
  • Smith
  • Stanard
  • Gravely
  • Johnson
  • Coleman
  • Brockmeyer
  • Campbell
  • Morehouse
  • Claycomb
  • O'Meara
  • Bolte
  • Lee
  • Rubey
  • McKinley
  • Gmelich
  • Painter
  • Crossley
  • Lloyd
  • Bennett
  • Winter
  • Harris
  • Davis
  • Blair
  • Long
  • Bush
  • Eagleton
  • Morris
  • Phelps
  • Rothman
  • Woods
  • Carnahan
  • Wilson
  • Maxwell
  • Kinder
Authority control
  • VIAF: 43943287
Persondata
Name Jackson, Hancock Lee
Alternative names
Short description American politician
Date of birth May 12, 1796
Place of birth
Date of death March 19, 1876
Place of death


Other articles related to "jackson, hancock lee jackson, hancock, lee":

Political Party Strength In Missouri
... (D) Robert William Wells (D) Thomas Hart Benton (D) 1828 ... Andrew Jackson and John C. 1DR 1830 John Cummins Edwards (D) David Barton (NR) 1831 Alexander Buckner (D) 1832 Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren (D) Y 1833 Daniel Dunklin (D) Lilburn Boggs (D) John Walker (D ... Breckinridge (D) Y 1857 Trusten Polk (D) Hancock Lee Jackson (D) Benjamin Franklin Massey (D) Ephraim B ...
List Of Counties In Mississippi - List
... km2) George County 039 Lucedale 1910 Formed from Greene and Jackson Counties James Z ... Grenada 700421906000000000021,906 7002422000000000000422 sq mi (70031093000000000001,093 km2) Hancock County 045 Bay Saint Louis 1812 Formed from Un-O ... sq mi (70031505000000000001,505 km2) Hinds County 049 Jackson and Raymond 1821 Formed from Un-Organized (Choctaw Cession of 1820) Thomas Hinds, War of 1812 ...
List Of Lieutenant Governors Of Missouri - Lieutenant Governors
... Sterling Price 1⁄2 vacant August 27, 1855 January 5, 1857 Sterling Price 1⁄2 10 Hancock Lee Jackson January 5, 1857 February 27, 1857 Democratic Trusten Polk 1⁄3 ... August Bolte January 11, 1897 January 14, 1901 Democratic Lawrence Vest Stephens 24 ... John Adams Lee January 14, 1901 April 25, 1903 Democratic Alexander Monroe Dockery 1 ...

Famous quotes containing the words jackson, hancock and/or lee:

    In England the judges should have independence to protect the people against the crown. Here the judges should not be independent of the people, but be appointed for not more than seven years. The people would always re-elect the good judges.
    —Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

    It’s red hot, mate. I hate to think of this sort of book getting in the wrong hands. As soon as I’ve finished this, I shall recommend they ban it.
    —Tony Hancock (1924–1968)

    The President’s proclamation took the breath out of me this morning. He is in the hands of the Phillistines [sic] ...
    —Elizabeth Blair Lee (1818–?)