Hague Convention On The Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction

Hague Convention On The Civil Aspects Of International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, or Hague Abduction Convention is a multilateral treaty developed by the Hague Conference on Private International Law that provides an expeditious method to return a child internationally abducted by a parent from one member nation to another. Proceedings on the Convention concluded 25 October 1980 and the Convention entered into force between the signatory nations on 1 December 1983. The Convention was drafted to ensure the prompt return of children who have been abducted from their country of habitual residence or wrongfully retained in a contracting state not their country of habitual residence.

The primary intention of the Convention is to preserve whatever status quo child custody arrangement existed immediately before an alleged wrongful removal or retention thereby deterring a parent from crossing international boundaries in search of a more sympathetic court. The Convention applies only to children under the age of 16.

As of August 2012, 88 States are party to the convention. In February 2012, the treaty entered in force in Guinea. Entry into force for Lesotho is set for 1 September 2012.

Read more about Hague Convention On The Civil Aspects Of International Child AbductionProcedural Nature, Wrongful Removal or Retention, Habitual Residence, Special Rules of Evidence, Limited Defenses To Return, Non-compliance, State Parties

Other articles related to "convention":

Hague Convention On The Civil Aspects Of International Child Abduction - State Parties
... The map shows the Contracting States to the Convention as October 2011 ... State parties to the convention (members of the HCCH) State parties to the convention (non-members of the HCCH) ...

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