Grind Line

The Grind Line refers to a former forward line for the National Hockey League's Detroit Red Wings. Red Wings head coach Scotty Bowman modeled it after the Crash Line of the 1995 Stanley Cup champion New Jersey Devils.

Originally, the Grind Line in Detroit consisted of three players, Kris Draper, Joe Kocur, and Kirk Maltby, during the Red Wings heyday in the late-1990s. During the 1997 Stanley Cup Finals, the line was effective against the Philadelphia Flyers famous "Legion of Doom" line that featured Eric Lindros, John LeClair, and Mikael Renberg. After the 1998 season, Darren McCarty replaced Joe Kocur as the third linemate. The line was effective at "grinding" and wearing against the opposition's top scoring line by providing an enforcing presence, helping the team win four Stanley Cups.

After the 2004–05 NHL lockout in 2005, McCarty's contract was bought out by the team, breaking up one of the most famous lines in Detroit Red Wings history.

In the 2007–2008 season, the Detroit Red Wings re-signed Darren McCarty, and after a brief stint with the Grand Rapids Griffins, he rejoined the Detroit Red Wings for the end of the regular season and the playoffs. In his first game back on March 29, 2008 versus the St. Louis Blues, head coach Mike Babcock sent out his starting line of Darren McCarty, Kris Draper, and Kirk Maltby, reuniting the "Grind Line" once again. Since then, McCarty, Maltby and Draper have retired.

Other articles related to "grind, line":

Zalma, Missouri - History
... and brush dam and erected a water mill to grind corn ... the mill was later transferred to the Davault Bollinger line ... He put in machinery to grind wheat and corn, as well as a carding mill to card and wash wool ...

Famous quotes containing the words line and/or grind:

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    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)