Grinch Stole Christmas

Some articles on stole, grinch stole christmas, grinch stole, grinch:

Somebody Stole My Gal
... "Somebody Stole My Gal" is a popular song from 1918, written by Leo Wood ... including Somebody Stole My Gal (1931) Little Jack Little Orchestra (1936) When Willie Comes Marching Home (1950) My Favorite Year (1982) The Grass Harp (1995) Melinda ...
List Of 2000 Box Office Number-one Films In The United Kingdom
26, 2000 Charlie's Angels £3,182,114 48 02000-12-03December 3, 2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas £3,063,799 49 02000-12-10December 10, 2000 How the Grinch Stole ...
List Of Children's Books Made Into Feature Films - Fiction - H
... Julia DeVillers Read it and Weep (2006) How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957), Dr ... Seuss How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966) (TV) * Halloween is Grinch Night (1977) (TV) ** The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat (1982) (TV) How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (2000) How to Eat Fried Worms (1973 ...
Stole (vestment)
... The stole is a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations ... The center of the stole is worn around the back of the neck and the two ends hang down parallel to each other in front, either attached to each other or hanging loose ... The stole is almost always decorated in some way, usually with a cross or some other significant religious design ...
List Of 2000 Box Office Number-one Films In The United States
12, 2000 Charlie's Angels $24,606,860 46 02000-11-19November 19, 2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas $55,082,330 47 02000-11-26November 26, 2000 How. 48 02000-12-03December 3, 2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas $27,096,630 49 02000-12-10December 10, 2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas $18,646,520 50 02000-12-17December 17 ...

Famous quotes containing the words christmas and/or stole:

    Adults who still derive childlike pleasure from hanging gifts of a ready-made education on the Christmas tree of a child waiting outside the door to life do not realize how unreceptive they are making the children to everything that constitutes the true surprise of life.
    Karl Kraus (1874–1936)

    Come pensive Nun, devout and pure,
    Sober, steadfast, and demure,
    All in a robe of darkest grain,
    Flowing with majestic train,
    And sable stole of cypress lawn,
    Over thy decent shoulders drawn.
    Come, but keep thy wonted state,
    With even step and musing gait,
    And looks commercing with the skies,
    Thy rapt soul sitting in thine eyes;
    There held in holy passion still,
    Forget thyself to marble,
    John Milton (1608–1674)