Greek Astronomy - Astronomy in The Greco-Roman and Late Antique Eras

Astronomy in The Greco-Roman and Late Antique Eras

Hipparchus is considered to have been among the most important Greek astronomers, because he introduced the concept of exact prediction into astronomy. He was also the last innovative astronomer before Claudius Ptolemy, a mathematician who worked at Alexandria in Roman Egypt in the 2nd century CE. Ptolemy's works on astronomy and astrology include the Almagest, the Planetary Hypotheses, and the Tetrabiblos, as well as the Handy Tables, the Canobic Inscription, and other minor works.

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Greek Astronomy - Astronomy in The Greco-Roman and Late Antique Eras - Ptolemaic Astronomy
... the most influential books in the history of Western astronomy ... The Almagest gave a comprehensive treatment of astronomy, incorporating theorems, models, and observations from many previous mathematicians ... Newton's theories have not been adopted by most historians of astronomy ...

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