Great Chain of Being - The Great Chain of Being - Humanity

Humanity

For Medieval and Renaissance thinkers, humans occupied a unique position on the Chain of Being, straddling the world of spiritual beings and the world of physical creation. Humans were thought to possess divine powers such as reason, love, and imagination. Like angels, humans were spiritual beings, but unlike angels, human souls were "knotted" to a physical body. As such, they were subject to passions and physical sensations—pain, hunger, thirst, sexual desire—just like other animals lower on the Chain of the Being. They also possessed the powers of reproduction unlike the minerals and rocks lowest on the Chain of Being. Humans had a particularly difficult position, balancing the divine and the animalistic parts of their nature. For instance, an angel is only capable of intellectual sin such as pride (as evidenced by Lucifer's fall from heaven in Christian belief). Humans, however, were capable of both intellectual sin and physical sins such as lust and gluttony if they let their animal appetites overrule their divine reason. Humans also possessed sensory attributes: sight, touch, taste, hearing, and smell. Unlike angels, however, their sensory attributes were limited by physical organs. (They could only know things they could discern through the five senses.) The highest-ranking human being was the King.

Read more about this topic:  Great Chain Of Being, The Great Chain of Being

Other articles related to "humanity":

Lord (Kamen Rider) - Fictional History
... from the Unidentified Lifeforms (Gurongi Tribe) that attacked humanity two years ago ... Rinto?) tribe, defending them from the Gurongi in the past, thus linking the Lords to the Linto as humanity's protectors ... The reason for this is that Lords protect humanity, but do not think they require the power of Agito as it would only corrupt them ...
Humanity - Publications
... Humanity (journal), an academic journal published by the University of Pennsylvania Press humanity, a journal of non-fiction and photography published by The Humanity Initiative (www.human ...
Last Days Of Humanity - History
... in a grindcore band called Fatal Error prior to joining Last Days of Humanity ... he saw the opportunity to add their own noise project to the bill, and Last Days of Humanity was born ... Last Days of Humanity at this time consisted of only two vocalists (Erwin and Hans) ...
Looking Glass (series) - Book 2 - Vorpal Blade
... In dealing with the Looking Glasses, humanity has discovered precisely one friendly species ... About a hundred years in advance of humanity, the Adar have had all sorts of problems with the hostile entity known as the Dreen and their slave races ... With the discovery of an ally in Humanity they look forward to a brighter future ...
Church Of Humanity
... Church of Humanity was a positivist church influenced by Auguste Comte's "religion of humanity." Comte's "religion of humanity" in France, although small, inspired the rise of the "Church ... For example Anna Haycraft was raised in the "Church of Humanity" before converting to Catholicism ... led to an American version of the "Church of Humanity." This was largely modeled on the English church ...

Famous quotes containing the word humanity:

    With all their faults, trade-unions have done more for humanity than any other organization of men that ever existed. They have done more for decency, for honesty, for education, for the betterment of the race, for the developing of character in man, than any other association of men.
    Clarence Darrow (1857–1938)

    Hearing, seeing and understanding each other, humanity from one end of the earth to the other now lives simultaneously, omnipresent like a god thanks to its own creative ability. And, thanks to its victory over space and time, it would now be splendidly united for all time, if it were not confused again and again by that fatal delusion which causes humankind to keep on destroying this grandiose unity and to destroy itself with the same resources which gave it power over the elements.
    Stefan Zweig (18811942)

    Those of us who always abhorred slavery as an atheistical iniquity, gladly we join in the exulting chorus of humanity over its downfall.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)