Grange School, Greater Manchester

Oldham Academy North (formerly Grange School) is a mixed gender secondary school with academy status for 11 - 16 year olds in Oldham, Greater Manchester, England.

The academy is sponsored by E-ACT. The school will relocate to a new campus in Royton in 2013.

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